LANDMARKS

What began as a rural, agrarian settlement, Glendale has grown into a major urban center and the city's physical appearance has transformed in the process. Luckily for those with a passion for history, Glendale today is home to over 100 registered landmarks and historical sites that help chart the community's transformation. From quaint adobes and elegant mansions to iconic civic buildings and a performing arts venue, a tour of Glendale's landmarks is a journey through history.  

The following provides information on Glendale's most notable buildings and points of interest, all of which are on the National Register of Historic Places. To view the complete list of landmarks, visit the City of Glendale's Register of Historic Resources webpage

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ALEX
THEATRE

1925  I  MAP 
Egyptian and Art Deco elements distinguish this theatre, with its landmark marquee tower. Designed by Selkirk and Lindley, the City of Glendale bought this building in 1993 to become a venue for performing arts and films. 

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ARD
EEVIN

1903  I  MAP
Designed by Nathaniel Dryden, Ard Eevin (in Gaelic, "Heavenly View") was built for Dan Campbell, a civic leader. With elements of of Colonial, Craftsman and Victorian styles, the property is one of the most architecturally unique homes in the U.S.  

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CASA ADOBE
DE SAN RAFAEL

1871  I  MAP
Built by Tomas Sanchez, first sheriff of Los Angeles County, this adobe structure was restored in 1932 as a federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) project. The property now serves as a museum owned and operated by the City of Glendale. 

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CITY
HALL

1940  I  MAP
Constructed as a federal WPA project, the government building offers Art Deco and Beaux Arts elegance, with simple lines and symmetry to reflect the austerity of its era. It has served as Glendale's City Hall since its official opening in 1942.  


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DERBY
HOUSE

1926  I  MAP
Designed by Lloyd Wright, son of Frank Lloyd Wright, this house was to incorporate Mayan architectural design through use of pre-cast and knitted concrete blocks. The end result, however, appears to owe more to Islamic influence than to Mayan. 

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EL
MIRADERO

1903-09  I  MAP
The Moorish Style castle-like home of city founder Leslie C. Brand was fashioned after the East Indian Pavillion at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. It now serves as an art studio and gallery, and houses the City's arts resources library. 

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GRAND CTRL.
AIR TERMINAL

1928  I  MAP
Incorporating zig-zag moderne elements, this Spanish Colonial Revival style terminal was the site of many historic aviation events. The Walt Disney Company now owns the building, and is restoring and adaptively reusing it as a creative campus facility.

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HOTEL
GLENDALE

1924  I  MAP
Conceived by developer Charles Ingledue as a hotel-apartment complex, this building was a commercial and design failure. However, it provides a reminder of 1920s Glendale when optimism was unlimited in the future of the city. 


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MAIN
POST OFFICE

1932-34  I  MAP
Constructed during the Great Depression, this Italian Renaissance style post office has sumptuous marble, tile, bronze and ornamental plaster work. The building is said to be the last one, regionally, to be constructed in this style. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC DEPOT

1923  I  MAP
This Spanish Colonial Revival train station has been in continuous use since its opening in the 1920s. Restored to become the Glendale Transportation Center in 1999 it now services Amtrak, Metrolink and Greyhound transit lines. 

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VERDUGO
ADOBE

1828  I  MAP
Glendale's oldest adobe sits next to Oak of Peace, considered by some as the birthplace of California. At the location, generals agreed upon terms outlined in the Cahuenga Treaty, which ended the Mexican-American War in 1847.

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YMCA
BUILDING

1926  I  MAP
Need write-up.